Windows 7 - F2 function

Asked By jigh7 on 06-Feb-10 10:19 AM
Version: 2008
Operating System: Mac OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard)
Processor: Intel

Hi, I am a new mac user and I am using microsoft office for mac, but I am having some problems using son features that win offices have.  FOr example I use F2 in win office to see what cells are in use in a formula, but I couldnt find the same function in mac office...does any one know if there is such function?... Thanks in advance of you cooperation.




CyberTaz replied to jigh7 on 06-Feb-10 12:17 PM
The F2 key is not used for that in Mac Excel due to OS differentiation. The
Mac equivalent of 'edit in cell' is Control+U [although my personal
preference is to use the Formula Bar in the first place :-)].

That and most other keyboard shortcuts are defined in Excel Help.

HTH |:>)
Bob Jones
[MVP] Office:Mac



On 2/6/10 10:19 AM, in article 59bb25a5.-1@webcrossing.JaKIaxP2ac0,
TheRedOa replied to jigh7 on 06-Feb-10 02:09 PM
A different way of seeing visibly which cells are referred to is by double-clicking the cell that contains the formula. When you do this, all the referenced cells become highlighte and can then use the TAB key to toggle through each referenced cell. In order to use this technique you must go into Excel preferences and deselect "edit directly in cell". <br><br>This has always been the most efficient way for my pea-sized brain to see what is going on within the spreadsheet. Just depends how you like to work. <br><br>Bobby
Bob Greenblatt replied to TheRedOa on 08-Feb-10 04:24 PM
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.

--B_3348491099_69643
Content-type: text/plain;
charset="US-ASCII"
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

On 2/6/10 2:09 PM, in article 59bb25a5.1@webcrossing.JaKIaxP2ac0,

This is correct ONLY when the preference Edit directly in cells is OFF. You
are correct, it is the best and most efficient way to see what is going on
which is why I NEVER use edit directly in cell.

--
Bob Greenblatt [MVP], Macintosh
bobgreenblattATmsnDOTcom


--B_3348491099_69643
Content-type: text/html;
charset="US-ASCII"
Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable

in article <a href=3D"59bb25a5.1@webcrossing.JaKIaxP2ac0">59bb25a5.1@webcrossi=
ng.JaKIaxP2ac0</a>, "<a href=3D"TheRedOak@officeformac.com">TheRedOak@off=
iceformac.com</a>" <<a href=3D"TheRedOak@officeformac.com">TheRedOak@o=
ouble-clicking the cell that contains the formula. When you do this, all the=
referenced cells become highlighte and can then use the TAB key to toggle t=
hrough each referenced cell. In order to use this technique you must go into=
Excel preferences and deselect "edit directly in cell". <BR>
This has always been the most efficient way for my pea-sized brain to see w=
hat is going on within the spreadsheet. Just depends how you like to work. <=
BR>
Bobby<BR>
e:10pt'>This is correct ONLY when the preference Edit directly in cells is O=
FF. You are correct, it is the best and most efficient way to see what is go=
ing on which is why I NEVER use edit directly in cell.<BR>
TYLE=3D'font-size:9pt'><BR>
-- <BR>
Bob Greenblatt [MVP], Macintosh<BR>
bobgreenblattATmsnDOTcom</SPAN></FONT></FONT><FONT FACE=3D"Lucida Grande"><SP=
AN STYLE=3D'font-size:10pt'><BR>


--B_3348491099_69643--
CyberTaz replied to Bob Greenblatt on 08-Feb-10 04:48 PM
Hey Bob;

I whole-heartedly agree with you about editing directly in cells, but as for
the dbl-clk method being...

On 2/8/10 4:24 PM, in article C795EB5A.C1CB6%bob@nospam.com, "Bob


I have to disagree a little :-) It may be the most 'convenient' way, but I
find the Auditing Toolbar's features to be better, more informative & more
efficient. Especially if dealing with links or remote references because it
enables seeing exactly what is being referred to without hopscotching you all
over the place unless you choose to go there. If only it offered the
additional features supplied on the Dark Side.

Regards |:>)
Bob Jones
[MVP] Office:Mac
Bob Greenblatt replied to CyberTaz on 08-Feb-10 05:44 PM
On 2/8/10 4:48 PM, in article C795F0C4.5B00C%onlygeneraltaz1@com.cast.net,

I agree with you about the auditing tool bar. However, I rarely use it and
rely instead on double clicking. It usually gets me what I am looking for.

--
Bob Greenblatt [MVP], Macintosh
bobgreenblattATmsnDOTcom